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Tag: Little Red Riding Hood

Picturebook Study: Wolf Comes To Town by Denis Manton

Wolf Comes To Town Cover

Wolf Comes To Town must be one of the most underrated children’s book on the Internet. I was genuinely astonished to check out what others have said about this picturebook on Amazon and Goodreads. Both sites show a 1.5 star average rating at time of writing. Can you guess what reviewers don’t like about this book?

A. The story is poorly written and edited.

B. The illustrations are amateurish.

C. Not suitable for children due to the main character behaving badly and not going punished.

 

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The Symbolism Of The ‘Forest’

In Literature

The central story quality of the forest is that it is a natural cathedral. The tall trees, with their leaves hanging over us and protecting us, seem like the oldest wise men assuring us that whatever the circumstances, it will resolve as time moves on. It is the place where contemplative people go and to which lovers sneak away.

But this intense inward gaze of the forest also has a sense of foreboding. The forest is where people get lost. It’s the hiding place of ghosts and past lives. It is where hunters stalk their prey, and their prey is often human. The forest is tamer than the jungle; the jungle will kill anything in it at any moment. The forest, when it does its frightening work, causes mental loss first. It is slower than the jungle but still deadly.

– John Truby, The Anatomy Of Story 

In Australian Literature

The symbolism of the forest and its guardian monsters has flourished in the literature of Australia, where white settlement is very recent and where the settlers confronted a continent which appeared to them to be as much a wilderness as the cedar forest which Gilgamesh and Enkidu entered. The primary theme of white Australian writing, at least until the last few decades, has been the alienating and terrifying encounter with the land, but many Australian stories conclude on a far less confident note…The bush has evoked ambivalent responses from white Australians, but on the whole fear and uncertainty has outweighed delight. The white child lost in the bush is an iconic image in Australian art, and tales, such as the story of Eliza Frazer, in which lost Europeans are adopted by Aboriginal tribes and absorbed into their culture, grip white imaginations.

Deconstructing The Hero, Marjery Hourihan

The Drover’s Wife (1892): a simple, emblematic hero tale

Civilization/wilderness opposition is central. There is no triumph for civilization in this story.

 

Australian Children’s Book Of The Year 1968. White children must confront wilderness after disaster.

1973. Material from Aboriginal mythology dramatizes an encounter between a white child and the ancient land.

 

ohhhh so that’s why I’m single!

 

 

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