Anyone who sends their kid to piano lessons or any other kind of lesson has probably wondered this: At what point will I allow my kid to give up this pursuit if they’re not enjoying it, or actively resisting?

Time Ideas has an interesting article about the science of interest (which I didn’t know was a thing).

As researcher Suzanne Hidi notes, “Teachers often think that students either have, or do not have, interest, and might not recognize that they could make a significant contribution to the development of students’ academic interest.”

In fact, research suggests that well-developed personal interests always begin with an external “trigger”—seeing a play, reading a book, hearing someone talk—and that well-designed environments can make such a triggering more likely.

The main things I picked up from this article:

  1. Be friendly, chatty, engaging
  2. Model interest by being interested yourself
  3. We tend to preference intrinsic motivation over extrinsic motivators, but in reality, successful people are driven by both

Related:

The Most Important Lesson Schools Can Teach Kids About Reading: It’s Fun from The Atlantic

Honey, I Killed the Kids’ Love of Reading from Huffington

How To Create A Culture Of Reading from SLJ

Stop Trying To Make Your Kids Read from Principal Joey

Does It Matter If You Read to Your Kids at Bedtime (Specifically)? from Jen Robinson

The Pleasures Of Being Read To from The New Yorker

How To Help Young Children Love Chapter Books from What Do We Do All Day