Hunting Dogs In Art and Illustration

These hunting dogs are mostly from 20th century magazines and show the vital role dogs have played in tracking and catching game.

Humans have evolved in parallel to dogs and since wolves started to sniff around for tidbits, I recently heard the theory that we have ‘outsourced’ some of our senses to them. Notably, our sense of smell. In short, if dogs didn’t smell so well, we would smell better!

But a large part of a dog’s skull is given over to the sense of smell (including not just the brain but their Jacobson’s organ). Does this mean our association with dogs has literally made us smarter, since our lesser reliance upon smell has allowed human brains to expand in other ways? Fascinating stuff.

We can’t wiggle our nostrils independently. Dogs can.

PBS Nova
National Sportsman Magazine November 1936 B Upland Hunting Retriever dog
National Sportsman Magazine November 1936 B Upland Hunting Retriever
the country home magazine August 1936 art by Jack Murray
Hunter In Camp, With Pointer 1948 by Joseph Francis Kernan, who unfortuanately was called "the poor man's Norman Rockwell".
Hunter In Camp, With Pointer 1948 by Joseph Francis Kernan, who unfortuanately was called “the poor man’s Norman Rockwell”.
John the Baptist Quadrone (1844 – November 23, 1898). Let’s not forget that some of those hunting dogs were mothers!
Farmer’s Wife Magazine September 1932 artwork by Walter Beach Humphrey
Forest & Stream February 1919 Magazine  Hunting Dog Cover
Forest Stream Magazine, February 1919
Sports Afield September 1934 hunting dog
Sports Afield September 1934 cover art by Walter Joseph Wilwerding 
HUNTING AND FISHING Magazine December 1934
HUNTING AND FISHING Magazine December 1934
National Geographic Magazine North Greenland Eskimo Dog
N.C. Wyeth (American, 1882–1945) One January Afternoon 1915
Hunting & Fishing Magazine June 1934
Hunting & Fishing Magazine September 1938
Hunting & Fishing Magazine September 1938
National Sportsman Magazine February 1937-hunting dog
National Sportsman Magazine February 1937
Hunting & Fishing Magazine February 1937
Hunting & Fishing Magazine February 1937
National Sportsman Magazine January 1939 dog
National Sportsman Magazine January 1939 cover art
HUNTING AND FISHING Magazine September 1934 dog
HUNTING AND FISHING Magazine September 1934
Country Gentleman Magazine August 1952  illustration for 'Kirby's Gander'
Country Gentleman Magazine August 1952 illustration for ‘Kirby’s Gander’
National Sportsman Magazine November 1929
National Sportsman Magazine November 1929
1934 Cover Hunter Trader Trapper Raccoon Edwin Bolenbaugh
Hunter’s Luck by Joseph Francis Kernan
National Sportsman Magazine November 1935 dog
National Sportsman Magazine November 1935. An early Wallace and Gromit.
OUR ANIMAL FRIENDS CHILDRENS BOOK 1956 CLOTH PLATT & MUNK CO The English Setter – The Pointer
A Place By the Fire By William MacKellar 1966
OUR ANIMAL FRIENDS CHILDRENS BOOK 1956 CLOTH PLATT & MUNK CO Beagle, Cocker Spaniel, Doberman Pinscher, Irish Setter
A Place By the Fire By William MacKellar 1966
Heinrich Schlitt (1849-1923) for The Seven Swabians collected by the Grimms
Heinrich Schlitt (1849-1923) for The Seven Swabians collected by the Grimms
Duck hunting by Louis Vivin (1861-1936)

At first, Travis couldn’t stand the sight of Old Yeller.

The stray dog was ugly, and a thieving rascal, too. But he sure was clever, and a smart dog could be a big help on the wild Texas frontier, especially with Papa away on a long cattle drive up to Abilene.

Strong and courageous, Old Yeller proved that he could protect Travis’s family from any sort of danger. But can Travis do the same for Old Yeller? 

A loving threesome, they ranged the dark hills and river bottoms of Cherokee country. Old Dan had the brawn. Little Ann had the brains, and Billy had the will to make them into the finest hunting team in the valley. Glory and victory were coming to them, but sadness waited too. Where the Red Fern Grows is an exciting tale of love and adventure you’ll never forget.

Gillette Safety Razor advertisement published in the March 1906 issue of Redbook magazine
Le dogue de forte race from 1753
Le bichon from 1753. Probably not a hunting dog, but very cute! “Believed to be descended from the Barbet, it is believed the bichon-type dates to at least the 11th century; it was relatively common in 14th-century France, where they were kept as pets of the royalty and aristocracy.” (Wikipedia)
Le doguin from 1753
https://twitter.com/factsonfiIm/status/1345153645730353152

Header image: JAN 1938 SUCCESSFUL FARMING magazine cover art by Arthur Carl Bade (1899-1955)