The Clutching Foot Courage The Cowardly Dog

the clutching foot courage the cowardly dog

This episode of Courage seems to be a parody of an episode of a TV serial from the 1930s based on a novel by Arthur Reeve. It is called “The Clutching Handand is about a detective named Craig Kennedy. This serialised original includes the following elements:

  • A get rich quick scheme
  • Assuming a false identity
  • Criminals

The original is slow and pretty boring for a modern audience, but the creators of Courage The Cowardly Dog have created a masterful mishmash of the above elements and made a brand new story for children using the basic formula they have already established for themselves combined with broad strokes from Arthur Reeve.

Children’s stories often feature oversized (or undersized) characters/elements. We have that here, too, with Eustace’s massive festering foot which literally swallows him up.

This is the most difficult to watch episode so far in terms of gross out humour. Despite the cartoon depiction, the foot — and especially Muriel’s home remedies for the foot — really make my skin crawl.

STORY STRUCTURE OF “THE CLUTCHING FOOT”

Much use is made of The Rule of Three in Storytelling. “The Clutching Foot” is basically a spoof of a heist movie, so includes the classic scenes from those. There is a pyrrhic victory for Courage as he sacrifices his health and wellbeing to save the day.

WEAKNESS/NEED

It’s very clear by now that Courage’s needs and weaknesses never change. He is a dog who is charged with the task of saving his home and family.

A lot of the Courage stories happen at night, under the ominous cover of purple darkness.
A lot of the Courage stories happen at night, under the ominous cover of purple darkness.

This would get old after a while, except the humans Courage lives with have different weaknesses and needs depending on the episode. Here, Eustace is foiled by his refusal to see a doctor when his foot festers.

festering-foot

DESIRE

Eustace does not want to see a doctor — he wants to have a nap and wake up and find his foot all better. He lets Muriel try out her home remedies (three of them):

  1. Cactus
  2. Pinching crabs
  3. Green slime

cactus

pinching-crabs

green-slime

OPPONENT

Unfortunately for him, his foot completely takes over while he’s sleeping, and swallows him right up. This is basically an intruder in the house — the massive foot might as well be a monster who has come in through the window or a ghoul. The function is the same, but is a bit more like a psychological suspense story in that the monster is Eustace himself — it’s a part of him. The nasty part of himself is the very thing that will consume him in the end.

And it does. Quite literally.

eustace-wakes-up

close-up-of-eustaces-horrified-face

eustace-gets-swallowed-up

The gangster persona is a masterful touch for a foot opponent because the big toe can be the Don and the little toes can back up everything he says. The size of the toes equal the hierarchy in a typical gang.

back-up-guys

PLAN

With Eustace stuck inside it unable to speak, the foot itself comes up with a plan. This is a gangster foot, and speaks in a parody of gangsters from American film in the early part of the 20th century. The foot is going to use Muriel as bait, “Do what I say or the fat lady gets it,” and will force Courage to carry out heists for it.

foot-looks-at-map

Courage, of course, will do what he needs to in order to save Muriel (and Eustace by default.)

BATTLE

The battle sequence involves Courage

  1. Driving the getaway car
  2. Breaking into a bank and robbing the place. (He fails because although money showers down it’s all torn and singed from an explosion.)
  3. Holding up a train.

Courage is trying to appease the bad foot while also saving his family and not breaking the law. He manages to save the train from being robbed by eating a banana and throwing the skin onto the ground. At first I wondered if this was going to derail the train, but in fact it made the foot slip, sending the train far into the distance.

Once again we have a modification of the woman tied to railway tracks (we’ve seen it in an earlier episode with a toy train inside the house). Muriel screams as the foot holds her down. Courage risks his own life by standing in front of an oncoming train.

Stories in which likeable characters are forced to hold up a bank are popular in fiction. We have Thelma in Thelma and Louise, for instance. More recently we have an episode of Season Three of Black Mirror, “Shut Up And Dance”, in which a teenage boy and another reluctant man are forced to rob a bank or risk having their online activities emailed to everyone they know.

scene from Shut Up And Dance, Black Mirror
scene from Shut Up And Dance, Black Mirror

I wonder if these stories are popular because we’ve all wondered if we could pull off a bank heist. It’s a task that looks easy if only you can manage your emotions.

driving-the-getaway-car
The big toe delivers orders from the back seat. Courage mutters that he wishes he’d learnt to drive a stick. This is funny because we assume he never learnt to drive an auto, either, being a dog.
bank
As usual for this show, the target building is plonked in isolation in the middle of Nowhere. (Though you can find absolutely anything in this town.)
courage-breaks-into-bank
Breaking Bad has elements of a heist spoof, too. Inspired by movies themselves, Walt and Jessie get themselves into strife (and out again) after dropping their highly distinctive beanies. (All robbers need beanies.)
inside-tunnel
Crawling through tunnels with torches. Isn’t that what all good bank robbers do?
safe
All good heist scenes require a big safe.
basement
We wonder why Courage has pulled out a cold drink. He’s going to throw the ice cubes into the magma to try and cool it down. “I don’t know why I thought that would work!” he exclaims to the audience. Meanwhile, we wonder why he didn’t just pull ice cubes from his pocket if he has access to anything at all!

SELF-REVELATION

When the computer tells him that dog slobber can save the day, Courage is basically learning that the only one capable of saving everyone is himself. He must make the ultimate sacrifice. This is a pyrrhic victory. He must lick the foot.

licking-the-foot
Another excellent thing about feet is that they are ticklish. Courage partly defeats the opponent with mouth microbes but also by making them laugh hysterically until they retreat. Eustace reappears.

NEW EQUILIBRIUM

We see Courage in the bathroom brushing, gargling and flossing to get the disgusting taste of festering foot out of his mouth.

We end with a circular story when Courage discovers the fungus has transferred to his own tongue. The first we know of this is that the gangster voice echoes out from deep inside him. Next we see his mouth open:

gangster-tongue

King Ramses’ Curse Courage The Cowardly Dog:

In the “King Ramses’ Curse” episode of Courage the Cowardly Dog we have three plagues — since storytelling loves The Rule Of Three — and the plagues comprise a mixture of ancient and comically modern curses.

This horror comedy for children takes inspiration from ancient holy texts such as found in the Bible and in the Quran.

In the Bible we have The Ten Biblical Plagues, also known as The Plagues of Egypt.

In the Quran there is also mention of a plague and it’s pretty similar except it happens all at once.

king-ramses-curse
Ramses II ruled as pharaoh, or king, of ancient Egypt from 1279 to 1213 BC, the second longest reign in Egyptian history. He was the third king of the 19th dynasty, during the New Kingdom. Ramses, also spelled Ramesses or Rameses, was a highly popular ruler, and under him Egypt enjoyed great prosperity.

STORY STRUCTURE OF KING RAMSES’ CURSE

 

WEAKNESS/NEED

Muriel and Eustace are obliviously going on with their lives inside their house in the middle of Nowhere.

For the first time I notice the Bagges have a moose head on the wall. This will be used later as a sort of indoor fountain, when water gushes out of its mouth.
For the first time I notice the Bagges have a moose head on the wall. This will be used later as a sort of indoor fountain, when water gushes out of its mouth.

Courage sees a crime happening right outside his window but is unable to stop Eustace from getting himself involved. Continue reading “King Ramses’ Curse Courage The Cowardly Dog:”

The Rule Of Three In Storytelling

The rule of three in storytelling has several uses. The first works like this:

  • One tells us what the risk is.
  • Two confirms what wrong behavior is.
  • At three, we know the rules, and so can appreciate what the smart third person is doing differently, to break the un- successful pattern and win.

If that folk tale was about just one pig who built a house of bricks in the first place, and the wolf couldn’t get in no matter how he huffed and puffed, where would the story be? Conflict, but no drama, just stalemate. Success for the pig, but no suspense. Anticlimax. No story.

Refer to: Picturebook Study: The Three Little Pigs

the-story-of-the-three-little-pigs

Three is suspense, pattern, and contrast, all in one nifty little technique as old as storytelling.

It’s the scientific technique of the variable, with third time lucky.

From Anson Dibell’s book on writing called Plot:

If somebody fails twice, in similar circumstances, there’s going to be more tension and drama when they try the third time because we’ve already seen them fail and know it can happen. We know what doesn’t work, we know the situation; now we’re focusing on what they’re doing differently this time. We’re aware of the pattern, the apparent rules, and are concentrating on the one thing that changes.

Instead of two repetitions, you can use the Rule of Three.

  • The first time the bell coincides with the painful electric shock, you’re too busy being shocked to notice.
  • The second time, you think uneasily that maybe it wasn’t a coincidence.
  • The third time, you’ve started jumping before the bell is even done ringing.

If you want your reader interested and involved in the scene before it’s fully begun to happen, there’s nothing like a triple set- up to get things rolling. It gives added drama. It directs the read- er’s attention where you want it directed. And it makes the scene’s meaning clear in a way it could not have been in isolation.

Choose and control the variable with care, keep the situations visibly comparable so the reader will be aware of the bell/ shock pairing and be anticipating the outcome, and all three scenes will gain in impact and effectiveness.

The second use is far more simple. Show a character doing something three times and we will assume they keep on going until the end.

An example of this occurs in Mercy Watson Thinks Like A Pig. Eugenia, the arch nemesis, plants pansies all around her house. Mercy makes a hole in the hedge and eats three pansies. Then the chapter ends. We deduce that she eats far more than three pansies. If left to her own devices, she will eat all of the pansies.

 

For an example of The Rule Of Three in a popular movie, see this article about Star Trek: First Contact.

ALSO PERTINENT

The most important thing I [Nora Ephron] learned from Lee [a chef] was something I call the Rule of Four. Most people serve three things for dinner — some sort of meat, some sort of starch, and some sort of vegetable — but Lee always served four. And the fourth thing was always unexpected, like those crab apples. A casserole of lima beans and pears cooked for hours with brown sugar and molasses. Peaches with cayenne pepper. Sliced tomatoes with honey. Biscuits. Savory bread pudding. Spoon bread. Whatever it was, that fourth thing seemed to have an almost magical effect on the eating process. You never got tired of the food because there was always another taste on the plate to match it and contradict it.

– Nora Ephron, from I Feel Bad About My Neck