Tag: Robin Black

  • Conflict In The Kitchen

    Conflict In The Kitchen

    Cover by Jessie Willcox Smith; lower left bottom says H114; original is faded and watermarked; Bell, Louise Price, “Kitchen Fun- Teaches children to cook successfully”, Harter Publishing Co, Cleveland, Ohio, ©1932, 28 pages

  • Zoomorphism and Chremamorphism

    Zoomorphism and Chremamorphism

    In literature, an object with human characteristics is called ‘personification‘. Granting an animal human-like characteristics is called ‘anthropomorphism‘. (Anthropo = human being, as in ‘anthropology’. ‘Morph’ = change.) Both personification and anthropomorphism are types of metaphors. But what do you call it when it’s the other way round? i.e., when a human being is compared […]

  • A Country Where You Once Lived by Robin Black Analysis

    A Country Where You Once Lived by Robin Black Analysis

    “A Country Where You Once Lived” by Robin Black (2010) is a great example of a short story in which the present story plays out alongside the backstory of a stand-out inflection point (“fulcrum”) which happened 13 years earlier. Two separate time periods merge into one. Whenever this happens in a story we are reminded…

  • Pine a Short Story by Robin Black Analysis

    Pine a Short Story by Robin Black Analysis

    “Pine” is a short story from a collection called If I Loved You, I Would Tell You This published 2010, written by Robin Black. This is a wonderful example of a contemporary story loosely based on an old fairytale—this time it’s Bluebeard. “Pine” is also an excellent example of a story which centres a homophone…

  • If I Loved You by Robin Black Short Story Analysis

    If I Loved You by Robin Black Short Story Analysis

    “If I Loved You” is a short story from a collection called If I Loved You, I Would Tell You This (2010), written by American author Robin Black. A woman dying of cancer writes an imaginary letter to her new neighbour, who has uncharitably built a fence along their boundary line. This fence prevents her…

  • The Symbolism of Trains In Literature

    The Symbolism of Trains In Literature

    Why are trains so useful to storytellers? In stories, trains play a functional role, getting your characters from one place to another. But there’s more to it than that. Perhaps we encounter storytellers on trains more than in any other place.