Tag: Little Red Riding Hood

  • Sidewalk Flowers by Lawson and Smith

    Sidewalk Flowers by Lawson and Smith

    Sidewalk Flowers is a wordless Canadian picture book by poet JonArno Lawson and illustrated by Sydney Smith.

  • Wolf in the Snow by Matthew Cordell Analysis

    Wolf in the Snow by Matthew Cordell Analysis

    Wolf in the Snow (2017) is an almost wordless picture book written and illustrated by Matthew Cordell, with links to the Little Red Riding Hood fairy tale. All picturebooks are puzzles. The details of pictures invite attention to their implications. The unmoving pictures require viewers to solve the puzzle of what actions and motions they […]

  • The Little Governess by Katherine Mansfield Short Story Analysis

    The Little Governess by Katherine Mansfield Short Story Analysis

    Katherine Mansfield wrote. It’s a cautionary tale without the Perrault didacticism. It’s Little Red Riding Hood, but social realism. This story exists to say, “You’re not alone.” It’s a gendered story, about the specifically femme experience of being alone in public space. Some critics find the ending inadequate. This is a stellar example of a lyrical short story with emotional closure but no plot closure. And it only succeeds in offering emotional closure if the reader can identify with the experience.

  • The Oral Origin Of Fairytales

    The Oral Origin Of Fairytales

    The era in which oral folktales became written fairytales was also the era in which children’s literature as a whole began to develop. How did oral tales change once they became written-down stories? First, the main audience shifted, notably, from the peasant class to the monied classes. Main characters were previously adults; now they were…

  • Story Structure: The Big Struggle

    Story Structure: The Big Struggle

    All complete narratives feature a big struggle scene. No, that doesn’t have to be a literal big struggle scene, Lord of the Rings style. In fact, we should be thinking outside that box altogether. One thing I love about Larry McMurtry’s anti-Western novels (especially Lonesome Dove) is that he condenses the gun big struggles and torture scenes in favour…

  • The Amazing Bone by William Steig Analysis

    The Amazing Bone by William Steig Analysis

    Last year marked the 40th anniversary of William Steig’s The Amazing Bone. This is remarkable because it feels, in some ways,  like a much more modern picture book than that. This is all to do with Steig’s voice.  Pearl is at no point mortally afraid. We know and she knows that this is a storybook world in…

  • Jack And The Flumflum Tree by Julia Donaldson and David Roberts Analysis

    Jack and the Flumflum Tree is a picture book by Julia Donaldson and illustrated by David Roberts. The title suggests this may be a retelling of Jack and the Beanstalk but it’s not really — this is an original tale based on mythic structure with elements of Little Red Riding Hood (the sick grandma) and pirate…

  • Charles Perrault’s Fairytale Morals: Rewritten For A Modern Audience

    When Charles Perrault wrote down the fairytales he’d collected from the wider culture, he ended each one with a summary which summed up the moral. In many cases, his take on the moral was pretty far from earlier tellings. Perrault wrote in a tongue-in-cheek manner — that much is clear. But as with any kind…

  • Breaking Bad And The Influence Of Classic Fairytales

    Vince Gilligan broke new television ground by writing a series about a good man turned evil. He also borrowed from a long history of storytelling. Walt White is a modern superhero archetype, but Breaking Bad also borrows from classic fairytales. Most modern stories do. PUSS IN BOOTS The unnamed cat in Puss In Boots is determined…

  • Intertextuality of Into The Forest by Anthony Browne

    Intertextuality of Into The Forest by Anthony Browne

    Into The Forest by Anthony Browne is story book, part ‘toy book’. Young readers learn to look at pictures and search for intertextuality, as each illustration links to a well-known fairy tale. This makes the book popular for classroom use, along with the Shrek films and modern stories with fairy tales as ur-texts.

  • The Plot Points Of Every Single Fairytale

    Not every fairytale includes every plot point as listed below, but when they do, they appear in order.

  • Fairytale Archetypes

    Fairytale Archetypes

    Marina Warner has a great way of thinking about fairytale archetypes: Imagine them as pieces on a chessboard. We know all we need to know about them just from their appearance. Moreover, their position on the board limits the number of possible moves they’re able to make. If you’ve ever seen Tarot cards, the archetypes…