Yours by Mary Robison Short Story Analysis

An old crate label for canned pumpkin

“Yours” is a 1982 short story by American writer Mary Robison. The year before The New Yorker published this short story, Robison published a novel called Oh! which was adapted for film in 1989. The film is called Twister. I don’t meant the late 90s blockbuster but a domestic drama set during a cyclone. Delusional……

Queen of the Falls by Chris Van Allsburg Picture Book Analysis

“Queen of the Falls” is a picture book written and illustrated by Chris Van Allsburg. Some years ago, Van Allsburg gave a TED talk on this book and the history behind it. This post will focus on the storytelling techniques. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vAxYJIoWDso&ab_channel=TEDxTalks Elsewhere on the Internet Chris Van Allsburg shared some of his roughs, when he……

The Home Girls by Olga Masters Short Story Analysis

William Frederick Yeames - For the Poor

“The Home Girls” is a short story by Australian writer Olga Masters (1919 – 1986), and the first story of Masters’ 1982 collection, also called The Home Girls. I’m interested in Olga Masters partly because her fiction wasn’t published until she was in her 50s. Then, when she was published, she won a bunch of……

The Fairytale Importance of the Literary Salon and Marie-Catherine d’Aulnoy

First, what is a salon? 1. A RECEPTION ROOM IN A LARGE HOUSE The common feature of a salon: It is set up for social interaction. Madeleine Lemaire – Le Gouter au Salon du Peintre, 1891. As shown in the header illustration, “Grand Salon” Hôtel du Collectioneur, Paris 1925. Arch. Emile Jaques Ruhlmann, a salon……

The Symbolism of Water Wells

Henry John Yeend King - By the Well

In folklore and fairy tale, round, enclosed structures (towers and wells) align with lunar figures which stand in for cyclic time i.e. dragons, serpents, werewolves or other related creatures who abduct maidens. And also, by the way, dishevelled hair and shaggy furs worn as garments are the other symbol set which go hand-in-hand with round,……

The Golden Age Of Brownies

Palmer Cox (1840 - 1924) for The Brownie Year Book 1895

A brownie is a fairy from English and Scottish folklore. They live in houses (so are a type of hobgoblin — ‘hob’ referring to the cooking equipment with hot plates). They are industrious. Like German poltergeists, they sometimes mess up the joint. This is done out of mischief rather than malice. However, the Yorkshire boggarts……