Tag: Dr Seuss

  • Dad Jokes, Puns and Related Words

    Dad Jokes, Puns and Related Words

    PUNS Puns are often simple wordplay for comedic or rhetorical effect. DAD JOKES Puns are at the heart of “Dad Jokes”, though in Dad Jokes, the “dad” generally pretends he doesn’t understand the speaker’s intended meaning. The Dad feigns stupidity, the Victim knows he’s only playing stupid, and the joke succeeds if it elicits a groan from the Victim. The…

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  • The Cat In The Hat by Dr Seuss: Archetypal Carnivalesque

    The Cat In The Hat by Dr Seuss: Archetypal Carnivalesque

    The Cat in the Hat is a 1957 children’s book written and illustrated by the American author Theodor Geisel, using the pen name Dr. Seuss. I keep mentioning this book as an archetypal example of the carnivalesque story subgenre in children’s literature but I’ve never actually broken that down, until now! THE REVOLUTIONARY POWER OF THE CAT IN THE HAT…

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  • Green Eggs and Ham by Dr Seuss Analysis

    Green Eggs and Ham by Dr Seuss Analysis

    This month I’m blogging a series aimed at teaching kids how to structure a story. This seven-step structure works for all forms of narrative. It works for picture books, songs, commercials, films and novels. Today I take a close look at another Dr Seuss early reader, Green Eggs and Ham. Green Eggs and Ham is buddy comedy from the late 1950s…

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  • I Had Trouble In Getting To Solla Sollew Analysis

    I Had Trouble In Getting To Solla Sollew Analysis

    This month I’m blogging a series aimed at teaching kids how to structure a story. This seven-step structure works for all forms of narrative. It works for picture books, songs, commercials, films and novels. Today I take a close look at I Had Trouble In Getting To Solla Sollew by Dr Seuss. Solla Sollew is plotted using classic mythic structure. A character…

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  • And To Think That I Saw It On Mulberry Street by Dr Seuss Analysis

    And To Think That I Saw It On Mulberry Street by Dr Seuss Analysis

    And To Think That I Saw It On Mulberry Street was Ted Geisel’s first book. Well, he’d written an abecedary but failed to interest publishers in it. It took a while to find a publisher for this one, too, but compared to what author/illustrators are up against today, I’m guessing 20 rejections is actually pretty good. Dr Seuss may never have moved…

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  • Thidwick The Big-Hearted Moose by Dr Seuss Analysis

    Thidwick The Big-Hearted Moose by Dr Seuss Analysis

    Theo Geisel had a thing for antlers. In the mid-nineteen thirties, Theodor Geisel was a fledgling author and artist, operating as an illustrator for New York advertisement agencies. His father, superintendent of parks in Springfield, Mass., from time to time sent him antlers, expenditures and horns from deceased zoo animals. Geisel stored them in a box below his bed and…

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