Parties in Fiction

Parties provide an excellent setting for getting people together. And when people are together this creates conflict, the backbone of any story.

Whenever I did creative writing exercises with high school students in English class, I knew it was no good asking them to write about autobiographical events which had recently happened. My own English professor at teachers’ college had told us that people need at least seven years of reflection before writing about our own lives well. Since these kids were about 13 and 14, I asked them to remember a time from when they were seven or younger. I didn’t ask them to discuss their memories with their classmates as part of the drafting process because I wanted them to come up with their own memories, but after a few years of doing this I finally learned something else — the vast, vast majority of kids will write about birthday parties and injuries. I got so sick of reading about stitches and broken bones that I asked them not to write about injuries. I also learned that there’s nothing inhrently interesting about a birthday party.

However, birthday parties are important to young people, and of all the memories we make during childhood, parties are some of the most resonant. Not surprising, then, that parties feature large in children’s stories.

Apart from bringing people together, promising conflict, there is another useful storytelling function for the tea party, demonstrated in picture books such as Pettson and Findus by Sven Nordqvist and the Mercy Watson series by Kate diCamillo. These stories have carnivalesque elements, and an inherent problem with the carnivalesque plot is that the hijinks must at some point wrap up. The tea party makes for an excellent conclusion to a fun, hygge children’s story. Typically, the small community sits down together and shares food. No matter what just happened, all is well with the world. In some long-running series, the sit-down food party concludes every single story.

Food, in general, is important in children’s literature.

Frederick Daniel Hardy - The First Birthday Party
Frederick Daniel Hardy – The First Birthday Party

DRESS UP PARTIES

This watercolour illustration of a fancy dress party is by Carl Larsson.
This watercolour illustration of a fancy dress party is by Carl Larsson.

TEA PARTIES

THE BARN DANCE

Haugtussedans, 1903, Theodor Kittelsen
Haugtussedans, 1903, Theodor Kittelsen
An Unexpected Party -The Hobbit  Brothers Hildebrant 1977
An Unexpected Party -The Hobbit Brothers Hildebrant 1977

Header painting: Elenore Abbot (1875–1935)

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