Category: Folklore and Fairytale

  • The Wind Is My Lover (Singoalla) Swedish Classic

    The Wind Is My Lover (Singoalla) Swedish Classic

    I need to show you these beautiful illustrations by Swedish illustrator Carl Larsson, more famous for colourful, domestic scenes.

  • Witches’ Cats In Art and Storytelling

    Witches’ Cats In Art and Storytelling

    Illustrators frequently depict witches in two mutually exclusive ways: erotic and alluring, or as ugly as the dominant culture can possibly proscribe. Here are some ugly witches dancing around a fire.

  • Nymphs and their Habitat

    WHAT ARE NYMPHS? Nymphs are minor female nature deities from Ancient Greek folklore. Like Pan, they serve as personifications of nature but unlike Pan, who can turn up anywhere (e.g. in The Wind In The Willows or as a character in The Secret Garden), nymphs are typically tied to a specific place. They are usually […]

  • A Glossary of Fairytale Words

    A Glossary of Fairytale Words

    Terms you come across when reading up on fairy tales.

  • Variations On Once Upon A Time

    Variations On Once Upon A Time

    When creating a fairytale world, certain language marks the tale as timeless. Why timeless? Stories which begin in a fairytale fashion share the quality of essential truth. Earlier audiences assumed this essential truth to be the essence of God’s own voice: In the beginning was the Word. John 1:1 Fairytales begin with a similar, familar…

  • The Princess and the Pea by Hans Christian Andersen Fairy Tale Analysis

    The Princess and the Pea by Hans Christian Andersen Fairy Tale Analysis

    The Princess and the Pea was first published in 1835, one of a handful of satirical, colloquial fairy tales in an unbound collection by Danish storyteller Hans Christian Andersen. The colloquial language didn’t go down well with critics at the time, who also didn’t appreciate that Andersen’s silly little “wonder tales” failed to convey a moral suitable for children.

  • The Fairytale Importance of the Literary Salon and Marie-Catherine d’Aulnoy

    The Fairytale Importance of the Literary Salon and Marie-Catherine d’Aulnoy

    First, what is a salon? 1. A RECEPTION ROOM IN A LARGE HOUSE The common feature of a salon: It is set up for social interaction. As shown in the header illustration, “Grand Salon” Hôtel du Collectioneur, Paris 1925. Arch. Emile Jaques Ruhlmann, a salon is also a feature of a grand hotel. 2. WHERE…

  • Creepy Donkey Skin Fairy Tales Analysis

    Creepy Donkey Skin Fairy Tales Analysis

    “Donkey Skin” is an old tale which appealed to Charlies Perrault. Perrault included his own version (called “Peau-d’ Ane, Conte”) in Old-time Stories told by Master Charles Perrault (1921), ensuring the tale’s enduring popularity, and cementing Perrault’s particular spin on it in popular imagination.

  • The Golden Age Of Brownies

    The Golden Age Of Brownies

    A brownie is a fairy from English and Scottish folklore. They live in houses (so are a type of hobgoblin — ‘hob’ referring to the cooking equipment with hot plates). They are industrious. Like German poltergeists, they sometimes mess up the joint. This is done out of mischief rather than malice. However, the Yorkshire boggarts…

  • Fear of Engulfment in Storytelling

    There’s a very good reason why girls should be told the truth about baby-making as soon as they ask: If she’s old enough to be asking, she’s old enough to be worrying. Unless they’re told exactly how pregnancy happens, young girls often worry that it may happen to them at any time, without warning. The…

  • Creating A Fairytale World

    To a modern audience, what makes a setting feel ‘fairytale’? What is it about the tone, style and plot? I argue here that what makes a fairytale setting feel ‘fairytale’ is mostly the ‘fairytale logic’. Just as we know, almost intuitively, that a particular narrative is a fairy tale when we read it, it seems…

  • Old Mother Frost Fairy Tale Analysis

    Old Mother Frost Fairy Tale Analysis

    Old Mother Frost” is a German fairy tale also known as “Mother Holle”, “Mother Hulda” and “Frau Holle”.