A large part of any book is written not by its author but by the world its author lives in.

– Peter, Hollindale, Ideology and the Children’s Book, 1988

 

A writer’s own values are inevitably implicit in the text, seeming simply part of the texture of reality. The countless nineteenth-century children’s stories which restrict girls and women to limited domestic roles are products of their writers’ unexamined assumptions about gender, and they carry a powerful, though passive, ideological message. More generally, stories are the products of the time and the social group which gave rise to them, and the values of that time and that group will inform the language in which they are written.

– Deconstructing The Hero, Marjery Hourihan, 1997