Culture is not merely an epiphenomenal outcome of computational systems in human brains, but in part at least is the result of feedback upon those systems by the high-level concepts and practices which earlier mental activity produced. Culture assumes an existence of its own outside the individuals who affect it. The majority of people may be passive consumers or spectators of culture, but significant minorities have a crucial influence on cultural development and content — chiefly: religious leaders, demagogues, writers, and thinkers — and the ordinarily vague grasp of the majority is a set of diluted versions of what these few have wrought.

– A.C. Grayling, The Reason Of Things

(An epiphenomenon is a secondary phenomenon that occurs alongside or in parallel to a primary phenomenon.)