A Dill Pickle by Katherine Mansfield

A Dill Pickle Katherine Mansfield

“A Dill Pickle” is a 1917 short story by Katherine Mansfield. Over the course of a single cafe scene, a woman meets up with a former beau. This is a feminist story about how men and women tend to communicate, and illuminates Mansfield’s deep interest in psychology.

Download full text of “A Dill Pickle” by Katherine Mansfield (pdf)

WHAT HAPPENS IN “A DILL PICKLE”

A man and woman meet after six years apart. It is revealed that they used to be prospective lovers/beaus. The entire story is a conversation between them, and the reader sees (hopefully) that this partnership is doomed. A modern reader can probably put names to some of the psychological tricks going down.  Continue reading “A Dill Pickle by Katherine Mansfield”

The Soviet Union Children’s Books

Best Loved Books In The Former Soviet Union

  • The True History of a Little Ragamuffin by James Greenwood (written by an English author, for adults, but little known in the UK)
  • Books by Boris Zakhoder (who translated Alice In Wonderland into Russian very adeptly)
  • An early Soviet classic, Schwambrania by Lev Kassil is about two provincial Russian brothers growing up prior to and after the revolution of 1917. Bored by dull reality, they invent a land of their own which has everything their real life lacks. Unlike a magical world such as Narnia or Never-Neverland, the imaginary world is always portrayed as simply make-believe.  This make believe land is girl-free. When they let a girl in, it turns to crap. Lev (author/storyteller) remains misogynist. At the end of the book, the reader is supposed to believe that the USSR has become so great that the boys no longer need their imaginary world.
  • For small children (pre-school and primary) three authors ruled the USSR: Agniya BartoSamuil Marshak and Korney Chukovsky.
  • For older children there was more variety, for example The Two Captains (1938 and 1944) by Kaverin was popular. Some people adored Krapivin and Anatoly Alexin. Teenagers read the Strugatsky brothers’ science fiction.
  • russian fairytales

Continue reading “The Soviet Union Children’s Books”