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It will be interesting for me to come back later to this post and see how I’ve had to change the wording or the colour scheme. So far I’m going for a green and golden hue. The pages will get darker as the story progresses.

I’m in two minds about the font. Comic book readers are used to reading in all caps, but I do lose something in the writing because at times I capitalise certain words for a specific effect. The comma in this particular font (Universal Fruitcake) looks too much like the full-stop, so I may have to go and manually do something about that.

I am tempted to add patterns to the wallpaper etc but it does take an entire week to do a single page, so if I linger on this one I’m off schedule… So, onwards and upwards — page one done and only another 31 to go. This time we have decided to go with exactly 32 pages, which is a printed picturebook convention initially decided on due to binding. In digital books there is no such print limitation, but The Artifacts was shorter than that (I think 22 pages) and Midnight Feast is much longer, and I have a hunch that whether readers know it or not, we’re conditioned to reading a picturebook 32 pages in length. It hasn’t been easy to tell the story that’s in my head in exactly that number of pages — something which print authors have always had to do, I suppose — but the good thing is, interactivity of apps allows for certain aspects of story to be told in economical fashion. Storyboarding for 32 pages has been a matter of condensing interactivity, and transferring certain assets from one page to another. I hope it will work without too much card shuffling at the end.